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German Scoring System
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Hello War Thunder pilots! In this article we will be looking at a very different subject; the German scoring system and reward for Luftwaffe fighter pilots. Obviously, with multiple aircraft classes it was fitting that certain targets were worth more than others. The attack and destruction of a B-17, for example, was considered much more difficult than the destruction of a single-engine aircraft. So let’s look at this in more detail:
 

The destruction of a single-engine aircraft was valued at 1 point, divided between the pilots that shot it down. Damage to a twin-engine aircraft or destruction of an already damaged four-engine bomber also yielded 1 point. A ½ point was awarded for the destruction of an already damaged twin-engine aircraft, although shooting one down gave 2 points. Heavy, four engined bombers,being resilent and very hard to deal with, were also worth 2 points when damaged to the point it was forced to leave formation and 3 points when shot down.
 

This point system set up was used primarily to act as an incentive for an aggressive attack. Heavy bombers were a top priority during the massive bombardment of German cities by the Allies; those involved in the destruction of these assets were quickly rewarded as their values ​​were high. Of course, all those seeking personal glory would be wiser to focus on these four engine bombers. If a pilot operating over the Western Front successfully shot down a B-17 or Lancaster, for example, all 3 points would be awarded to him, guaranteeing an Iron Cross First Class. However, whilst operating over the Eastern Front, to obtain this same medal a pilot would need 7 victories to his credit.


To simplify this, here are some examples:
 

Iron Cross 1st Class, 1939-1945

Franz and his two wingmen, Erwin and Alfons, are flying Bf109s; they engage a formation composed of 3 Lancasters, 3 Wellingtons and 4 Spitfires. Franz and Erwin manage to damage one Spitfire each. Franz destroys a Spitfire alone and gives a helping hand to Erwin for the last one which is also shot down. Alfons meanwhile, wanting a medal at any price that would make his neighbors jealous at the end of the war, heads straight for the Wellingtons. He destroys one, damages the second and the third, which is finally shot down by Erwin. Erwin’s fighter is hit by return fire and is forced to abandon the pursuit.
 

Franz and Alfons, with little ammunition left, try to shot down two Lancasters. Franz runs out of ammunition and the attacked Lancaster is only slightly damaged and able continue its mission. Meanwhile, the bomber attacked by Alfons is severly damaged; one of its engines is on fire and it is forced to break formation, but Alfons also runs out of ammunition before destroying it. As this combat has occured on the Western Front, the total points for each pilot according to the point system is:

Franz = 1  ½, Erwin = 1, Alfons = 6
 

Alfons therefore receive his Iron Cross 1st Class and succeeds in his inital plan of making his neighbors jealous at the end of the war. This is obviously a very simple run through a highly complex subject; the area of kill claiming and the process of confirmation has not been touched upon, but hopefully this will give a brief insight into this subject.
 

The War Thunder Team
 

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