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Search result : 20 planes

A5M4

A single-seater, carrier-based, all-metal monoplane fighter with an open cockpit and fixed landing gear. The world's first carrier-based monoplane. A prototype of this fighter first flew on February 4, 1935.

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1937
A6M2 Zero

At its launch, the A6M2 model 11 knew no equal. This single-seater carrier-based fighter was designed to replace the aging A5M. To reduce its weight, duralumin was widely used, and its propeller was made of a lightweight aluminum alloy. 

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1941
A6M2-N Zero

The single-seater, single-engine float seaplane fighter A6M2-N was created to cover combat operations near atolls, where the construction of airfields was often impossible.

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter, Floatplane
Year : 1942
A6M3 Zero

In April of 1942, a new A6M model fighter was launched. The main difference between the A6M3 model 32 and the A6M2 Model 21 was the new Sakae 21 engine (1130 hp), which had a two-stage supercharger making it more stable at higher altitudes and a screw diameter of 3.05 m...

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1942
A6M5 Zero

At the beginning of the war, A6M series planes were among the best fighter planes, not only in Japan but also in the world. However, over time, better Japanese aircraft were needed to effectively counter such enemies as the American F6F Hellcat and the F4U Corsair

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1943
B5N2

Before the advent of the B5N, Japan used the B2M and B4Y as torpedo biplanes. However, the significant limitations of biplanes were obvious, so in 1935, inspired by the monoplane A5M fighter, the Imperial Japanese Navy developed the 10-Shi torpedo bomber specification.

Country : Japan
Type : Bomber, Torpedo Bomber
Year : 1939
D3A1

The single-engine carrier-based Aichi D3A dive bomber, a metal-construction monoplane, was created by order of Japan’s Supreme Command of Naval Aviation to replace the obsolete D1A biplane. The shape of the wing and tail, as well as the presence of special dive brake flaps..

Country : Japan
Type : Dive Bomber
Year : 1940
F1M2

A single-engine all-metal biplane with a main central float and two additional underwing floats. It was originally built as a catapult-launched reconnaissance floatplane specializing in gunnery spotting for battleships and heavy cruisers of the Imperial Japanese Navy.

Country : Japan
Type : Floatplane
Year : 1940
G4M1

The long-range twin-engine Mitsubishi G4M torpedo bomber had a relatively small bomb load of 1000 kg but a long flight range of about 6000 km. Because of the Washington Naval Agreement, Japan was far behind in fleet construction. 

Country : Japan
Type : Bomber, Torpedo Bomber
Year : 1941
H6K4

A quad-engined all-metal parasol-wing monoplane flying boat. An experimental version, the Type S, made its first flight on July 14, 1936. The plane was approved by the Imperial Japanese Navy as Type 97 Large Flying Boat in 1937. Mass production began in 1938.

Country : Japan
Type : Bomber, Flying Boat, Torpedo Bomber
Year : 1939
Ki-200

When American Boeing B-29 Superfortresses began to raid the islands of the Empire on a mass scale, the need to create a high-speed, fast-climbing, powerfully armed interceptor became ever more pressing for the Japanese aircraft industry. The Japanese, however, completely lacked experience in creating aircraft of such a class, and some initial work in this field had no effect on the bombing's intensity, since the interceptors available to the Army and the Navy were inadequate.

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1945
Ki-43-II

The single-seater Japanese Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Peregrine Falcon) fighter was designed to replace the Ki-27 in the Japanese Imperial Army’s Air Force.

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1941
Ki-49-I

Twin-engine monoplane medium bomber with retractable landing gear and tail wheel. The development of a new medium bomber (heavy bomber, by Japanese standards) for the Japanese Army Air Force began in the spring of 1938. The new airplane was to replace the Mitsubishi Ki-21 bomber.

Country : Japan
Type : Bomber
Year : 1940
Ki-49-IIA

In the spring of 1942, it was decided that the Ki-49 should be fitted with new engines, the Nakajima Ha-109 radial piston engines, rated at 1450 hp. This required only a slight modification of the engine nacelles, as the new engine was a similar size to that of its predecessor. However, the oil cooler could not fit inside the nacelle along with the engine and was put outside, instead. Other changes were made to improve combat conditions: the armor protecting the airplane's crew was upgraded and self-sealing fuel tanks were installed, as well as a new bomb sight.

Country : Japan
Type : Bomber
Year : 1942
Ki-49-IIb

In the spring of 1942, it was decided that the Ki-49 should be fitted with new engines, the Nakajima Ha-109 radial piston engines, rated at 1450 hp. This required only a slight modification of the engine nacelles, as the new engine was a similar size to that of its predecessor. However, the oil cooler could not fit inside the nacelle along with the engine and was put outside, instead

Country : Japan
Type : Bomber
Year : 1942
Ki-61-Ia-Hei

A lightweight multipurpose fighter plane, the Ki-61 Hien (“Swallow”) was well-armed and well-armored. From the very beginning, the makers of the Ki-61 concerned themselves with protecting the fuel tanks and the pilot. 

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1943
Ki-61-Ia-Ko

A lightweight multipurpose fighter plane, the Ki-61 Hien (“Swallow”) was well-armed and well-armored. From the very beginning, the makers of the Ki-61 concerned themselves with protecting the fuel tanks and the pilot. The light multipurpose fighter was an effective answer to “hit-and-run” fighters,  thanks to its survivability and high diving speed.

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1943
Ki-61-Ia-Otsu

A lightweight multipurpose fighter plane, the Ki-61 Hien (“Swallow”) was well-armed and well-armored. From the very beginning, the makers of the Ki-61 concerned themselves with protecting the fuel tanks and the pilot. The light multipurpose fighter was an effective answer to “hit-and-run” fighters, thanks to its survivability and high diving speed.

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1943
N1K2-J

A single-seat, all-metal monoplane fighter with a closed canopy. The "Shiden" holds a unique place in the history of airplane construction. This land-based interceptor was based on the N1K1, which had been designed to support amphibious operations.

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1943
N1K2-Ja

This fighter-bomber version of the N1K2, the N1K2-Ja Model 21Ko, was developed at the time the N1K2-J began production. The main difference between the two planes was the 21Ko's steel underwing pylons. This Shiden-Kai could carry four 250-kg bombs, two under each wing, or two 500-kg bombs, or two or four 60-kg bombs. It could also carry unguided rockets, like the N1K2-J.

Country : Japan
Type : Fighter
Year : 1943
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