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Search result : 13 planes

CR.42 Falco

The Fiat CR.42 Falco (“Falcon”) fighter plane had, for a biplane, excellent speed and handling, and is rightly considered one of the best biplanes of the Second World War. Despite the fact that it was clear (even at the time of the prototype CR.42) that monoplanes would have an advantage in air battles..

Country : Italy
Type : Fighter
Year : 1939
G.50 Freccia seria 2

The Fiat G.50 Freccia (“Arrow”) was the first Italian all-metal monoplane fighter, which, although clearly inferior to allied fighters of the time, was the best Italian fighter aircraft.


 

Country : Italy
Type : Fighter
Year : 1937
G.50 Freccia seria 7AS

The Fiat G.50 Freccia (“Arrow”) was the first Italian all-metal monoplane fighter, which, although clearly inferior to allied fighters of the time, was the best Italian fighter aircraft. Development of the fighter began in 1936, at the request of the Italian Air Force...

Country : Italy
Type : Fighter
Year : 1937
M.C.200 serie 3

A single-engine fighter with retractable landing gear. The M.C.200, soon nicknamed the Saetta (“Lightning”), was created in 1937 as an interceptor, designed to "protect our national territory in case of need". The plane was used until about 1943 as an escort plane and a ground attack fighter. 

Country : Italy
Type : Fighter
Year : 1939
M.C.200 serie 7

A single-engine fighter with retractable landing gear. The M.C.200, soon nicknamed the Saetta (“Lightning”), was created in 1937 as an interceptor, designed to "protect our national territory in case of need". The plane was used until about 1943 as an escort plane and a ground attack fighter. 

 

Country : Italy
Type : Fighter
Year : 1939
M.C.202

The Macchi M.C.202 was an Italian all-metal fighter interceptor, initially armed with nothing but twin synchronised 12.7mm (.50-cal) machine guns in the engine housing. The woefully ineffective armament for a fighter that plagued many other Italian fighters was finally remedied on the M.C.202 Serie VI (variants of the aircraft were designated with Roman numerals, I through XI), when two additional 7.7mm machine guns were added to the wings.


 

Country : Italy
Type : Fighter
Year : 1941
S.79 of 1936 year series

A mixed-construction monoplane with a retractable landing gear system including tail wheel. Crew: 4-5. Created in the SIAI (Societa Idrovolanti Alta Italia) design firm, led by Alessandro Marchetti, as a passenger aircraft.

Country : Italy
Type : Bomber
Year : 1936
S.79 of 1937 year series

Beginning with the 2nd production series, the S.79’s dorsal “hump” was shortened (previously it had reached almost to the front door), and the teardrop-shaped fairings were removed. On each side of the hump, a couple of windows were added to better illuminate the radio operator’s and mechanic’s workspaces.

Country : Italy
Type : Bomber
Year : 1937
S.79 of 1939 year series

The S.79 gradually became the Regia Aeronautica’s main strike plane. In 1938, five regiments were re-equipped. That same year, about 150 “Sparviero” aircraft were in service in Italy. A year later, over 300 were in service. 

Country : Italy
Type : Bomber
Year : 1939
S.79 of 1941 year series

By early 1941 the number of “Sparvieros" in the Italian Royal Air Force began to decrease. The more advanced CANT Z.1007 “Alcione”, also a three-engined plane, was replacing the ageing S.79. However, the “Sparviero” soon had another, just as important role as the primary “workhorse” of Italian naval aviation.

Country : Italy
Type : Bomber
Year : 1941
S.79B with IAR K14-II engines

During the pre-war period, SIAI actively tried to export the S.79. Alessandro Marchetti argued that twin-engine planes, not three-engine, would be best for export. So, in spite of the Royal Italian Air Force’s rejection of the S.79B bomber project, he continued work in this area, developing a prototype. 

Country : Italy
Type : Bomber
Year : 1938
S.79bis of 1942 year series

Savoia-Marchetti designers proposed upgrading the outdated S.79 by replacing its mixed design with an all-metal airframe. This would substantially reduce the aircraft’s weight while increasing the strength of its airframe. But the Royal Italian Air Force chose a compromise, instead: change the power unit, but keep the S.79’s old airframe. The resulting variant was named the S.79bis.

Country : Italy
Type : Bomber
Year : 1942
S.79bis of 1943 year series

On September 8, 1943, Italy surrendered and split in half; in the north, the Germans established a puppet Italian Social Republic (RSI), while the British and Americans controlled the south. The bulk of S.79 aircraft remained in the north. In addition, the aircraft factories were located there, as well as a stock of components and unfinished S.79bis airframes, so production of the planes continued.

Country : Italy
Type : Bomber
Year : 1943
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